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A Brief History on Pot Pie

Pot Pie

Eliza Craft, Pie Bar Marietta

You may think of pot pie as that quick dinner you can pop in your oven at the last minute, but pot pie has a rich history dating back to the Roman Empire. You may have heard the nursery rhyme that goes “four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie,” and it’s based on truth! Some of the first pot pies, made during the Roman Empire, were baked with live birds inside that would fly out when sliced into. 

Pot pies became even more popular in 16th century Britain. Meats such as venison, pork, lamb and other game were common fillings and birds eventually took over the scene during the reign of Elizabeth I. During the Elizabethan era, pot pies were decorated, craftfully made, and served at banquets and would prove the talent of the chefs making them. More basic versions were often made by the lower class, as the ingredients were easy to come by and the crust added more bulk to a meal. 

The popularity of pot pie moved west along with the settlers who moved to America. In 1796 the first American-written cookbook was published entitled “American Cookery.” This cookbook included recipes for Stew Pie, Sea Pie, and Chicken Pie which are all variations on Pot Pie.

After its American cookbook debut, pot pie then continued to grow into what it is today. In the 1950’s, pot pie became a household staple and hit freezer sections across the country. Frozen meals were on the rise after the war and pot pies were not excluded. You may recognize the names Morton, Marie Callender, and Stouffer’s as some of the top frozen food brands serving pot pie. 

Pot pie has also recently made a comeback in restaurants. Chefs have started to create their own trendy takes on pot pies. Some have become more like savory cobblers with a biscuit topping. Others use different fillings or a phyllo crust. While these are interesting takes, there is something just so comforting about a classic pot pie.

Our Pot Pies are our take on the American style classic. We stick with a standard super flakey crust for our Rosemary Chicken pot pie and our Roasted Veggie pot pie. Our Rosemary Chicken pot pie is filled with both white and dark meat chicken, potatoes, peas, carrots, celery, and onions all in a rosemary gravy. Our Roasted Veggie pot pie is filled with roasted sweet potatoes, broccoli, and mushrooms along with the standard pot pie veggies potatoes, peas, carrots, celery, and onions all in a rosemary mushroom gravy. You can’t go wrong with either of these delicious choices in either the personal or family size! You can enjoy the taste of homemade with the convenience of baking straight from the freezer. We can’t wait to spice up your dinner table when you try one out (but sadly, the live birds are not included).